Posts Tagged: The Tempest

Outdoor Shakespeare: The pioneers of a summer tradition

Shakespeare by the sea, on the river, in the park or garden, on the common – in the summertime Shakespeare’s plays are everywhere outdoors! High-profile shows in New York’s Central Park or at Ashland’s Oregon Shakespeare Festival may come to mind for active theatergoers today, but the inspiration for this kind of outdoor performance actually… Continue Reading »


Caliban by the Yellow Sands: Shakespeare and immigrant communities in New York – Excerpt: Here in This Island We Arrived

Here in This Island We Arrived: Shakespeare and Belonging in Immigrant New York is a 2019 book from Elisabeth H. Kinsley that explores Shakespeare performance in late 19th- and early 20-century Manhattan during a time of profound demographic change, when New York City’s foreign-born population grew from under half a million in 1880 to almost… Continue Reading »





Teller and The Tempest: Magic in Shakespeare’s time

In Shakespeare’s The Tempest, the magician Prospero conjures up a storm, charms his daughter to sleep, and uses his power to control Ariel and other spirits. Is this magic for real, or is Prospero pulling off elaborate illusions? Fascinated by this question and by Prospero’s relinquishing of magic at the play’s end, Teller (of the magic/comedy… Continue Reading »


Prospero and Persiles: Comparing the late romances of Shakespeare and Cervantes

In preparing for the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s and Miguel de Cervantes’ deaths, it is worth considering the writing they produced toward the end of their careers, particularly since these works bear striking similarities in setting, plot, and theme. For Shakespeare, this group of plays, categorized as romances, includes Pericles (1606-1608), Cymbeline (1608-1610), The… Continue Reading »


Shakespeare in the Caribbean

As you’ll hear in this episode of the Folger’s Shakespeare Unlimited podcast, Shakespeare and his plays are woven deeply into the culture of the British Caribbean. Even after centuries of British colonial rule came to an end, Shakespeare endured—in fascinating ways that come out in conversation with two scholars.