Posts Categorized: Staging-shakespeare

Hamlet wasn’t always the prince with the common touch

When we think about Shakespeare on the stage we usually imagine two different historical moments: ‘then’ and ‘now’. ‘Then’ is Shakespeare’s lifetime, when Richard Burbage, the original Hamlet, first spoke ‘To be or not to be’ from the stage of the Globe Theatre on London’s Bankside. ‘Now’ is the present moment, whether for audiences at… Continue Reading »


‘Sweetly Writ’: King Lear and the First Folio in Oregon

What can we learn from Shakespeare’s revisions to his plays, and what does that mean for the actors and directors who make their own changes to his texts today? Oregon Shakespeare Festival explores these questions in a new original work called Sweetly Writ, which demonstrates how Shakespeare conceived different takes on the same characters and… Continue Reading »



Shock of the New, or a Ploy from the Past? Thoughts on OSF’s Play “Translations”

Much ado about the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, which has announced plans to ‘translate’ all of Shakespeare’s plays into contemporary English. The Play On project is commissioning 36 playwrights (each paired with a dramaturg) over three years  to produce modern renderings of the entire Shakespeare dramatic canon. For OSF, the plays are companion pieces, not replacements;… Continue Reading »


As You Like It in Esperanto: Washington, DC, 1910

Folger Finds delivers delightful and insightful moments with the Folger collection. Sarah Hovde, a cataloger at the Folger Shakespeare Library, shares the story behind a 1910 Esperanto edition of Shakespeare’s As You Like It.