Posts Categorized: Shakespeare-in-the-world

Excerpt – ‘Mad Blood Stirring’ by Simon Mayo

Inspired by a real-life episode, Simon Mayo’s novel ‘Mad Blood Stirring’ tells the powerful story of a Shakespeare production by African American prisoners of war at Dartmoor prison in England, near the end of the War of 1812.



Enjoy the top five Shakespeare & Beyond blog posts of 2018

Enjoy our most popular Shakespeare & Beyond blog posts from 2018, an eclectic range including a tasty 17th-century recipe, a quiz, a new play on Sarah Bernhardt and Hamlet, a female science fiction author from 1666, and a look at theater etiquette in Shakespeare’s time and now.


Drawing Shakespeare: Macbeth

Artist Paul Glenshaw describes drawing John Gregory’s bas-relief of Macbeth, the three witches, and their cauldron, with a focus on the vast cloud of smoke made from stone. “I realized as I drew it that the smoke was as much a character in this setting as the witches and Macbeth himself,” he writes.


Thine Own Self

From the question “What are you?” (Countess Olivia) to “Tell my story” (Hamlet), Austin Tichenor looks at finding your identity and telling your story, through a decidedly Shakespearean lens.


Exploring Churchill’s Shakespeare

Enjoy a discussion led by Washington Post journalist Robert Costa, moderator of Washington Week, with Georgianna Ziegler, curator of Churchill’s Shakespeare, and Allen Packwood, director of the Churchill Archives Centre, exploring Shakespeare’s influences on Winston Churchill.


Was it the first Shakespeare film? The silent King John

With Herbert Beerbohm Tree as the king, the four-minute silent movie “King John” (1899) is often called “the first Shakespeare film,” as Michael Anderegg explains. Watch the surviving one-minute fragment and learn more about its theatrical star.


Eight Christmas gift ideas for Shakespeare fans

We’ve got eight Shakespeare-related Christmas gift ideas from the Folger shop, most of them under $30 and some under $15, from books and jewelry to a bath duck and more.


Drawing Shakespeare: The Merchant of Venice

Paul Glenshaw draws “The Merchant of Venice” bas-relief from the series by sculptor John Gregory at the Folger Shakespeare Library — and finds depictions of the same scene with some similar elements in the Folger collection.


Shakespeare and World War I

In 1916, the 300th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death coincided with World War I, although the United States had not yet entered the conflict, yet both the US and European combatants on both sides of the war took time to honor Shakespeare and his works.