Posts Categorized: Shakespeare-in-the-world


Drawing Shakespeare: Julius Caesar

Artist Paul Glenshaw describes drawing the Folger bas-relief of “Julius Caesar,” in which assassins with their knives start to turn away as Caesar dies. He pairs the image with a painting by Jean-Léon Gérôme at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore and a matching engraving at the Folger, which reflect the same scene just a moment later.


In the Giving Vein: The Pop-Cultural Legacy of Olivier’s Richard III

With a US audience of tens of millions in its TV release at the same time it was released in American theaters, Laurence Olivier’s film “Richard III” (1955) has left a lasting, sometimes hilarious, legacy in pop culture, from Peter Sellers’s lofty and amusing reading of the Beatles’ “A Hard Day’s Night” in Olivier’s style to modern-day TV villains who speak directly to the camera and win us to their side.


Excerpt – ‘Mad Blood Stirring’ by Simon Mayo

Inspired by a real-life episode, Simon Mayo’s novel ‘Mad Blood Stirring’ tells the powerful story of a Shakespeare production by African American prisoners of war at Dartmoor prison in England, near the end of the War of 1812.



Enjoy the top five Shakespeare & Beyond blog posts of 2018

Enjoy our most popular Shakespeare & Beyond blog posts from 2018, an eclectic range including a tasty 17th-century recipe, a quiz, a new play on Sarah Bernhardt and Hamlet, a female science fiction author from 1666, and a look at theater etiquette in Shakespeare’s time and now.


Drawing Shakespeare: Macbeth

Artist Paul Glenshaw describes drawing John Gregory’s bas-relief of Macbeth, the three witches, and their cauldron, with a focus on the vast cloud of smoke made from stone. “I realized as I drew it that the smoke was as much a character in this setting as the witches and Macbeth himself,” he writes.


Thine Own Self

From the question “What are you?” (Countess Olivia) to “Tell my story” (Hamlet), Austin Tichenor looks at finding your identity and telling your story, through a decidedly Shakespearean lens.


Exploring Churchill’s Shakespeare

Enjoy a discussion led by Washington Post journalist Robert Costa, moderator of Washington Week, with Georgianna Ziegler, curator of Churchill’s Shakespeare, and Allen Packwood, director of the Churchill Archives Centre, exploring Shakespeare’s influences on Winston Churchill.


Was it the first Shakespeare film? The silent King John

With Herbert Beerbohm Tree as the king, the four-minute silent movie “King John” (1899) is often called “the first Shakespeare film,” as Michael Anderegg explains. Watch the surviving one-minute fragment and learn more about its theatrical star.