Posts Categorized: Research-and-discovery

The Richard Stonley diary: Rediscovering an early Shakespeare purchase

Forty-five years ago on Shakespeare’s birthday, the Folger announced that Laetitia Yeandle, then curator of manuscripts, had “rediscovered” a long-lost diary entry marking the first recorded purchase of Shakespeare’s first publication, Venus and Adonis.



Shakespeare in Argentina

In Argentina, political turmoil and economic problems are key features in Shakespeare productions, as the country grapples with post-dictatorship culture.


Barbara Mowat on editing Shakespeare

Editing Shakespeare’s works is a complex process, explains Barbara Mowat, who with Paul Werstine edited the Folger Shakespeare Library editions.




Thomas Nashe: A dominant literary voice in Elizabethan England

We are used to thinking of Elizabethan (and Jacobean) literature with Shakespeare at the center, but evidence suggests that, although Shakespeare was considered an important writer in the last decade of the queen’s reign, Thomas Nashe was one of the dominant literary voices.


Shakespeare and the American Revolution

By the time the first battles of the American Revolution took place in 1775, Shakespeare had been imported from England on stage and page to the New World.


Shining a light on the other playwrights of Shakespeare’s day

A Digital Anthology of Early Modern English Drama (EMED, for short) is a large, searchable digital resource on the hundreds of commercial plays by the other authors of Shakespeare’s time—including dozens of newly edited play texts.


Shakespeare, ecology, and the environment

What does Shakespeare say about ecology and its politically engaged cousin environmentalism? Neither term appears in his work—unsurprising since they hadn’t been coined yet. Nevertheless, we see Shakespeare thinking ecologically in ways that resonate with our own perceptions of the environmental challenges we face today.